My Aging Parent is Resisting Care

My aging parent is resisting care? How do I deal with this?

As the Canadian population ages, children of seniors are increasingly challenged with parents who need support.

In many instances, parents resist this assistance, as it often represents a loss of independence. How can we plan for these changes?

As is the case with most things in life, we can make the most progress with an open honest discussion. Families should include all interested parties in the process – siblings, friends, neighbours. This will ensure that down the road when important decisions need to be made, everyone will feel included.

If it has not been addressed recently, this is a good time to revisit your Will and Powers of Attorney. In the process of discussing wishes, it can lead to a discussion on current personal needs. Although these can often be difficult discussions to have, a proactive approach will likely help the parent to accept life stage challenges with grace.

We are specialized in dealing with elder care and have associated our firm with many elder associations that can help. Call us to discuss!

905.337.3307

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